UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


Sangu Mandanna’s Top 10 UKYA books

Author photo (Colour)My list of favourite books – UK, YA or not – changes all the time! Like, weekly. I read something new and love it and BAM! It’s on the list. But then there are some books that never quite get bumped off the list, no matter what else comes after, and my list today is mostly comprised of these books. I’ve probably forgotten some of my favourites and will later kick myself, but anyway. I will also admit that in some cases my definition of “UKYA” is loose, but to me these books and authors totally count!

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

This is one of the loose ones. It’s as British as they come, but is it YA? I’m pretty sure the characters are adults. But the themes of self-discovery, first love and coming of age are so intrinsically YA that this is how I always think of it. Either way it’s a fantastic book: it’s funny, it’s dark, it’s romantic, it’s so utterly thrilling. (And it doesn’t hurt that I love the film based on it too!) Basically, I love Neil Gaiman.

Harry Potter series by JK Rowling

No list of mine, whatever the genre or country, is complete without these books. They are filled with some of my most favourite characters of all time. I love them to bits.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Elizabeth Wein is American (I think?) but this novel is totally UKYA. It’s a story about friendship and courage and loyalty, which I love; a story about tricks and twists, which I love; a story that broke my heart, which I love – but it’s also a Second World War story, a spy story, and a story about flying planes, none of which I love. And yet this book is so wonderful, I loved those things about it too.

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff

Broke. My. Heart. Into. A. Thousand. Little. Pieces. That is all I can say. (Actually, I could probably also add that I loved that it was a war story and a dystopian story that did not need or rely on countless tedious, tired details about who, what, where, why, how. It was about characters caught up in the war and that was all that mattered.)

The Bride’s Farewell by Meg Rosoff

I’ll give this to Meg: she never writes the same book twice. Oh, and her books are awesome. The Bride’s Farewell is strange and twisty and romantic and utterly beautiful.

Della Says: OMG! by Keris Stainton

(Hi, Keris!) I have such an enormous soft spot in my heart for this book. It is funny, sweet and has a swoon-worthy boy – and those things are always a winner for me – but more than anything else, it really and truly makes me remember what it was like to be a teenager. So few YA books actually do that for me.

Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

In case you don’t know what this book is about, I’ll tell you: it’s about a boy and a girl who fall in love. They also happen to be brother and sister. By blood. Not adopted, not ‘in spirit’, not grew up side by side. It’s not a new subject for fiction by any means: The God of Small Things does it, Flowers in the Attic does it, other books do it. But this one is special for me. The romance should have made me feel icky, but the magic of this book is that it doesn’t. Everything tells me it’s wrong. This is a relationship that is forbidden in the most basic way. It’s not the casual, not-really-wrong kind of ‘forbidden’ that so many fictional romances play on today. It’s literally taboo. But when I read and reread the book I root for Lochan and Maya anyway. I want them to be together. Their love story is beautiful and passionate and tormented and doomed and all the things you want from a great love story.

Stolen by Lucy Christopher

Ditto Forbidden. A boy abducts a girl and keeps her prisoner, he loves her, she kind of loves him, but she’s still his prisoner and he’s probably not quite sane… and I want them to stay together?! That is the kind of thing I would never think in real life. And yet when I read this book for the first time all I wanted was for them to be together. That’s what this book does to you. Plus it’s got some stunning descriptions of the hot Australian outback…

His Dark Materials series by Philip Pullman

There are a lot of things I love about these books, from the settings to the characters to the literally allusions, but I’m just going to pinpoint the single most wonderful thing: daemons.

Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Long before YA dystopian novels became the Big Thing, Noughts and Crosses was a winner. I haven’t actually read the sequels, only because I feel unequal to the trauma of carrying on with the story without a Certain Something (it would be a major spoiler if I told you who or what that Something is, but if you’ve read it you’ll understand) but this instalment is exciting and rich and heartbreaking.

And there you have it!


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Cicely of Cicely Loves Books’ Top 10 UKYA

Book blogger Cicely of Cicely Loves Books shares her Top 10 UKYA faves.

Naked by Kevin Brooks

A really great, kind of tragic story about early punk in the 1970s; I was kind of taken aback by how much I really loved it. I wasn’t expected great feats from it at all, but it blew me away.

Shadows on the Moon by Zoe Marriott

A beautiful fantasy retelling of Cinderella that twists the story into something that feels fresh and new. It’s a lot darker than the Cinderella I grew up with too, though it only made the story better. I need to read the rest of Zoe’s books!

The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

What sort of a post would this be if it didn’t have Neil Gaiman on it! Even though he doesn’t technically live in the UK anymore, he still has a British accent so I’m counting it. Also, I guess it’s not 100 percent YA, but I do really love this book. It’s the first Gaiman book I ever read and I loved the feel to it, and the way he writes is amazing! Sorry, I like Neil Gaiman a lot…

Jessie Hearts NYC by Keris Stainton

SO. BLOODY. CUTE. I’ll be honest, I was torn between which of Keris’s books to put on here because I love all of them, but just the way New York was described in this book! It gave me a serious case of wanderlust, and now thanks to Emma I want to go to LA too. *saves up for a plane ticket*

Torn by Cat Clarke

One of the most twisted, gripping books I’ve read in ages. I literally couldn’t put it down. I was just so involved in the story and it moved me with how intense it was. The ending is pure evil, but it’s one of my favourite books.

Witch Child by Celia Rees

I read this book ages ago, actually, but I still really love it! It was one of my first introductions to historical YA and I just remember being really caught up in Mary’s story. The sequel, Sorceress, is just as good, but it made me cry. A lot.

Heart Shaped Bruise by Tanya Byrne

Another really dark, intense book (what does that say about me?!) that I just really loved. I was so torn for the whole thing, and I didn’t really know if I could trust Emily, but at the same time despite the crazy I really liked her and it made me feel stuff, guys! I felt so numb at the end, it was like I’d been on an emotional rollercoaster (cheeeeesy, but true).

Stolen by Lucy Christopher

I have so many feelings about this book it’s insane! This is another one of those wicked, moral twisting books that makes you want the wrong thing to happen because even though Ty kidnapped her he’s not that bad! Also, the whole letter-writing style it’s done in is really unique and I loved it once I got used to Ty being called ‘you’.

Adorkable by Sarra Manning

Another adorable book! Or should I say, Adorkable! (or maybe I shouldn’t. Sometimes I can’t hold back on the awful puns. I apologise.) This book just makes me want to hug it, and that’s all I’m going to say because this is already too long.

Long Lankin by Lindsey Barraclough

So dark and creepy! I loved this book, and I really want to read something new from her soon. Even though it wasn’t until about the last 150 pages that it got really creepy, it still kept me awake at night.