UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


Revolver by Marcus Sedgwick

41mbyyv0xJL1910. A cabin north of the Arctic Circle. Fifteen-year-old Sig Andersson is alone. Alone, except for the corpse of his father, who died earlier that day after falling through a weak spot on the ice-covered lake. His sister, Anna, and step-mother, Nadya, have gone to the local town for help.

Then comes a knock at the door. It’s a man, the flash of a revolver’s butt at his hip, and a mean glare in his eyes. Sig has never seen him before but Wolff claims to have unfinished business with his father.

As Sig gradually learns the awful truth about Wolff’s connection to his father, his thoughts are drawn to a certain box hidden on a shelf in the storeroom, in which lies his father’s prized possession – a revolver. When Anna returns alone, and Wolff begins to close in, Sig’s choice is pulled into sharp focus. Should he use the gun, or not?


She Is Not Invisible by Marcus Sedgwick

17934419Laureth Peak’s father has taught her to look for recurring events, patterns, and numbers–a skill at which she’s remarkably talented.

Her secret: She is blind.

But when her father goes missing, Laureth and her 7-year-old brother Benjamin are thrust into a mystery that takes them to New York City where surviving will take all her skill at spotting the amazing, shocking, and sometimes dangerous connections in a world full of darkness.


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My Swordhand is Singing by Marcus Sedgwick

When Tomas and his son, Peter, settle in Chust as woodcutters, Tomas digs a channel of fast-flowing waters around their hut, so they have their own little island kingdom. Peter doesn’t understand why his father has done this, nor why his father carries a long, battered box, whose mysterious contents he is forbidden to know.

But Tomas is a man with a past: a past that is tracking him with deadly intent, and when the dead of Chust begin to rise from their graves, both father and son must face a soulless enemy and a terrifying destiny.

Visit Marcus’s website


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Jenna Burtenshaw’s Top 10 UKYA reads

Jenna Burtenshaw, author of Wintercraft, Blackwatch and Legacy (out 10 May), shares her Top 10 favourite UKYA reads.

1: Verdigris Deep by Frances Hardinge

A witch, a curse, and spooky goings-on.  Everything about this story is dark, creepy, and wonderful.

2: Floodland by Marcus Sedgwick

I love books set in desolate futures. Floodland is one of my favourites.

3: The Bartimaeus Series by Jonathan Stroud

Four books filled with magicians and djinn, magic and corruption.  If you like action and sarcastic comedy, this is a must read series.

4: Pastworld by Ian Beck

Victorian London meets futuristic London, and there’s a mysterious killer on the loose.  Smoggy and atmospheric.

5: The Hunting Ground by Cliff McNish

I read this book in one sitting.  It’s a lot darker than I expected. Tense, very creepy, and well worth a read.

6: The Vanishing Of Katharina Linden by Helen Grant

Set in Germany, this book recalls dramatic events in a young girl’s life (and starts with one character bursting into flames). Put on your detective hat and enjoy.

7: Skellig by David Almond

Who is the stranger living in the garage? A wonderful story about hope, family, and friendship.

8: The Septimus Heap Series by Angie Sage

A fantastic world of magic, dragons, and talking messenger rats. Great fun.

9: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness and Siobhan Dowd

I don’t often cry when reading books, but I needed tissues at the end of this one.

10: The Larklight Series by Philip Reeve

Steampunk swashbuckling set in space. I’ll say no more.


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Laura of Sister Spooky: Book Fangirl’s Top 10 (and more) UKYA books

Laura of Sister Spooky: Book Fangirl‘s Top 10 UKYA picks. Plus a couple of extras she couldn’t resist (luckily for me). 

1. Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman: I adored this book for it’s ace storytelling as well as the way Malorie chooses to confront difficult issues like racism, social divides and terrorism.

2. His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman: A story full of magic and morals that is so cleverly woven together you can only read it in awe.

3. Adrian Mole, Aged 13 and 3/4 by Sue Townsend: one of the 1st YA I ever read as a teen and it made me feel happy that there were books with teens in and the embarrassing bits in too

4. Rockoholic by C.J.Skuse: I adore C.J.’s ability to make me completely connect with Jody and her love of music and the sadness in her life.

5. You Against Me by Jenny Downham: a heart wrenching book that leaves you numb

6. Witch Child by Celia Rees: wonderful storytelling and a fab take on historical fiction

7. Ash Mistry and the Savage Fortress by Sarwat Chadda: *bows at Sarwat* not only is this book full of humour and geekiness I adore but it has a kick ass hero that isn’t just you typical clean cut blond boy.

8. Torn by Cat Clarke: one of the few books I read that had me gripped and terrified.

9. My Swordhand Is Singing by Marcus Sedgwick: Haunting and scary. Like a classic Gothic novel for a YA audience that doesn’t dumb down because it’s YA.

10. Shadows on the Moon by Zoe Marriott: I cried; if you know me then you’d realise that makes this book GOLD!

I know this is a Top Ten list but I wanna give you two special mentions for books I would have put on my list but they’ve yet to be published.  I HIGHLY recommend you watch out for these two both out in June 2012

So

Emma Hearts LA by Keris Stainton: This is Keris’ next book and Keris (the super angel she is) let me get a sneaky peek at it. One of the first non-editor eyes to see it and I fell in love with the city, the characters, the romance and the sense of humour.  Sometimes you just need this kind of book in your life to give you a warm hug and a giggle. I’d flag this one up on your wish lists now because it was so wonderful!

and the second book

Geekhood by Andy Robb: Yes, I’ve been banging on about this one on my twitter since I read it but I just adored it. In my review I described it as ‘Adrian Mole for the Geek Generation’ and I mean every word. A fan-tabulous debut author who would be up on my Top 10 the second his book is published. His book and Andy himself are funny and honest. A read for boys and girls alike. Buy, buy buy.