UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


COMING SOON: Counting Stars by Keris Stainton

9781471404634A new life in a new city – would could possibly go wrong…?

When eighteen-year-old Anna leaves school and moves to Liverpool, she feels like her life is finally beginning. She’s landed her dream job at a theatre, and she’s moving into an exciting (if not slightly run-down) flat on a buzzing street lined with shops, bars, and buskers. Best of all, her new flatmates are kind, welcoming and a lot of fun – what more could she ask for?

But although her new life is fun, it’s also a little overwhelming. Anna’s job quickly falls through, and then she realises that although her new friends are great, they’re also a little mixed-up… and it’s not long before Anna starts using her blog to talk about her experiences, from the hilarious to the ridiculous to the little-bit-scary. But when Anna spills a bigger secret than she can handle, suddenly the consequences are all too real. She’ll have to prove she has the mettle to make it in the big city, or risk losing everything she thinks she wants.


Spotlight on Sunny (Reel Friends, #2) by Keris Stainton

sunnyAfter winning a local film competition, Sunny and her best friends Kitty and Hannah are off to do a film-making course – in London! Sunny can’t believe her dad has let her come on her own (even if he has asked her to phone every day…)

Sunny is loving the film-making classes and hanging out with their new friend – lovely, funny Will. Sunny knows that these things don’t fit with the future her parents want for her and she starts to wonder what she really wants.

And that’s not even the biggest thing on her mind – there’s also the big secret she’s hiding from her best friends…


Starring Kitty by Keris Stainton

21521965Sometimes the greatest love stories happen behind the scenes…

Kitty’s keeping secrets. Like how she’s struggling to cope with her mum’s illness. And how she’s falling for the girl with the purpley-red hair…

A fun film competition with her friends Sunny and Hannah seems like the perfect distraction. But then Dylan wants to be more than Kitty’s secret.

Is Kitty ready to let her two worlds meet or will she risk losing Dylan forever?

Published by Catnip Books, 10 July 2014


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Amber Kirk-Ford of The Mile Long Bookshelf chooses her Top 10 UKYA books

image1. By Any Other Name by Laura Jarratt – Some amazing action-packed scenes and surprising plot twists!

2. Undone by Cat Clarke – A heartbreaking story of romance and revenge.

3. The Boy From France by Hilary Freeman – Funny, realistic and full of adventure! The characters felt real and it was a nice break from the books I usually read.

4. Emma Hearts LA by Keris Stainton – The reason why I am now obsessed with LA! A really fun story to read, a great way to escape the stresses of real life. It left me smiling!

5. Boys Don’t Cry by Malorie Blackman – A hard-hitting realistic novel about the drama teenagers face every day. Definitely worth a read!

6. Finding Cherokee Brown by Siobhan Curham – Anyone who has been involved in bullying in any way, should read this book. It carries a really powerful message and manages to stay funny and light-hearted at the same time.

7. Diary of a Mall Girl by Luisa Plaja – A really sweet, romantic story that will make you smile and laugh whilst reading it.

8. Almost True by Keren David – Almost True is full of action and it is scarily realistic. This will keep you hooked from the first page!

9. Anthem for Jackson Dawes by Celia Bryce – An inspiring and truthful story set in a hospital ward about two teenagers with cancer, falling in love. I highly recommend this book.

10. Fallen Grace by Mary Hooper – Set in London in 1861, ‘Fallen Grace’ is about a girl who faces constant danger. It’s an excellent book!

Read Amber’s blog, The Mile Long Bookshelf, or follow her on Twitter, @MileLongBookS


Sangu Mandanna’s Top 10 UKYA books

Author photo (Colour)My list of favourite books – UK, YA or not – changes all the time! Like, weekly. I read something new and love it and BAM! It’s on the list. But then there are some books that never quite get bumped off the list, no matter what else comes after, and my list today is mostly comprised of these books. I’ve probably forgotten some of my favourites and will later kick myself, but anyway. I will also admit that in some cases my definition of “UKYA” is loose, but to me these books and authors totally count!

Stardust by Neil Gaiman

This is one of the loose ones. It’s as British as they come, but is it YA? I’m pretty sure the characters are adults. But the themes of self-discovery, first love and coming of age are so intrinsically YA that this is how I always think of it. Either way it’s a fantastic book: it’s funny, it’s dark, it’s romantic, it’s so utterly thrilling. (And it doesn’t hurt that I love the film based on it too!) Basically, I love Neil Gaiman.

Harry Potter series by JK Rowling

No list of mine, whatever the genre or country, is complete without these books. They are filled with some of my most favourite characters of all time. I love them to bits.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Elizabeth Wein is American (I think?) but this novel is totally UKYA. It’s a story about friendship and courage and loyalty, which I love; a story about tricks and twists, which I love; a story that broke my heart, which I love – but it’s also a Second World War story, a spy story, and a story about flying planes, none of which I love. And yet this book is so wonderful, I loved those things about it too.

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff

Broke. My. Heart. Into. A. Thousand. Little. Pieces. That is all I can say. (Actually, I could probably also add that I loved that it was a war story and a dystopian story that did not need or rely on countless tedious, tired details about who, what, where, why, how. It was about characters caught up in the war and that was all that mattered.)

The Bride’s Farewell by Meg Rosoff

I’ll give this to Meg: she never writes the same book twice. Oh, and her books are awesome. The Bride’s Farewell is strange and twisty and romantic and utterly beautiful.

Della Says: OMG! by Keris Stainton

(Hi, Keris!) I have such an enormous soft spot in my heart for this book. It is funny, sweet and has a swoon-worthy boy – and those things are always a winner for me – but more than anything else, it really and truly makes me remember what it was like to be a teenager. So few YA books actually do that for me.

Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

In case you don’t know what this book is about, I’ll tell you: it’s about a boy and a girl who fall in love. They also happen to be brother and sister. By blood. Not adopted, not ‘in spirit’, not grew up side by side. It’s not a new subject for fiction by any means: The God of Small Things does it, Flowers in the Attic does it, other books do it. But this one is special for me. The romance should have made me feel icky, but the magic of this book is that it doesn’t. Everything tells me it’s wrong. This is a relationship that is forbidden in the most basic way. It’s not the casual, not-really-wrong kind of ‘forbidden’ that so many fictional romances play on today. It’s literally taboo. But when I read and reread the book I root for Lochan and Maya anyway. I want them to be together. Their love story is beautiful and passionate and tormented and doomed and all the things you want from a great love story.

Stolen by Lucy Christopher

Ditto Forbidden. A boy abducts a girl and keeps her prisoner, he loves her, she kind of loves him, but she’s still his prisoner and he’s probably not quite sane… and I want them to stay together?! That is the kind of thing I would never think in real life. And yet when I read this book for the first time all I wanted was for them to be together. That’s what this book does to you. Plus it’s got some stunning descriptions of the hot Australian outback…

His Dark Materials series by Philip Pullman

There are a lot of things I love about these books, from the settings to the characters to the literally allusions, but I’m just going to pinpoint the single most wonderful thing: daemons.

Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Long before YA dystopian novels became the Big Thing, Noughts and Crosses was a winner. I haven’t actually read the sequels, only because I feel unequal to the trauma of carrying on with the story without a Certain Something (it would be a major spoiler if I told you who or what that Something is, but if you’ve read it you’ll understand) but this instalment is exciting and rich and heartbreaking.

And there you have it!