UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


Top 10 favourite UKYA by Jim from YAYeahYeah

Jim is an incredibly prolific book blogger, with YA Yeah Yeah, YA Contemporary and the fabulous new YA TV site, Young Adult TV. He shares his Top 10 faves with us. 

My top ten of anything changes pretty much daily. I haven’t even attempted to order these, because that way madness lies. If you asked me tomorrow, some of them would certainly still be on there, some may be nudged out by others which are just off the list at the moment. However, I think the ten below are wonderful books and series that all fans of UKYA should take a look at.

1. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
Wein has created one of the most memorable fictional pairings ever in narrators Verity and Maddie. A stunning, heartbreaking, but ultimately life-affirming book.

2. The Things We Did For Love by Natasha Farrant
I read this straight after Code Name Verity and really should have taken a break to stock up on tissues. Londoner Farrant’s portrayal of a French village where the Resistance are bravely fighting the Nazis, and a love story set against this backdrop, is staggering.

3. Skin Deep by Laura Jarratt
How can anyone be this talented with their debut book? Jarratt’s central couple of traveller Ryan and Jenna, who’s scarred from a car crash, are both battling their own issues but find conmfort in each other. The romance between the two is beautiful. As a book, it’s also incredibly unpredictable.

4. A Witch In Winter/A Witch in Love by Ruth Warburton
Winter, the small fishing town to which Anna and her father move at the start of the first of these novels, is a fabulous location and Warburton describes it so wonderfully that you can practically feel the sea breeze when reading. Add in some brilliant characters and great plots and you have a superb series so far.

5. Wereworld series by Curtis Jobling
I read the first of these novels expecting fairly mindless action – making the old mistake of judging a book by a cover – and was blown away by Jobling’s rich worldbuilding and incredible characters. This is a truly epic fantasy sequence which gets better with every new book.

6. When I Was Joe/Almost True by Keren David
David’s taut style, fast paced plot, and believable characterisation make these books completely impossible to put down. She’s created a male narrator who is really easy to like and who has a truly compelling story.

7. Before I Die by Jenny Downham
As I’ve mentioned above, I bawl like a baby quite often when reading books these days. When I first read this, I wasn’t reading much teen fiction and don’t think I’d ever cried at a book before. I broke down 3/4 of the way through this one and, rereading it years later, found it had lost none of its power. An incredible tearjerker.

8. Department 19 series by Will Hill
Hill writes books which are ridiculously long but never seems to waste a word. They’re arguably dangerous to read – there were so many shocking moments in book two, The Rising, that I nearly dropped it several times. (And this is one heavy hardback!) I’ll take the risk of a broken toe, though, and carry on with this series because Hill cuts between narratives wtih huge skill and manages to create absolutely compelling, multi-layered stories which leave you desperate to know what happens next.

9. Harry Potter series by J K Rowling
I like the first three and love the last four. I think Rowling did a phenomenal job of creating characters who lots of people cared about and some wonderful plots.

10. The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander
As a fantasy sequence, this is possibly unbeatable. Alexander created a wonderful world and characters who developed beautifully in the course of his five novels. A real gem.


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Tanya Byrne’s Top 10 UKYA books

Tanya Byrne, author of Heart-Shaped Bruise, chooses her Top 10 UKYA books.

Before I Die by Jenny Downham

I’m not going to lie, it took me a while to read this book because I was worried it wouldn’t live up to the hype. But as soon as I read the opening lines – I wish I had a boyfriend. I wish he lived in the wardrobe on a coat hanger. Whenever I wanted, I could get him out and he’d look at me the way boys do in films, as if I’m beautiful. – I knew it was a very special book.

Doing It by Melvin Burgess

With hindsight, I shouldn’t have been as surprised as I was by Doing It. I guess I’ve read so much YA where the most couples do is hold hands that I almost dropped this book several times when reading it. But sexy times aside, what I love most about Doing It is that it’s so honest. It gave me the courage to be more honest with my own book.

Entangled by Cat Clarke

I adore Entangled. It’s deliciously dark and very brave for a debut. Like Doing It, it’s breathtakingly honest and deals with issues like binge drinking and self-harming without being preachy or condescending. I also love the cover. [/shallow]

Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma

I’ve only just started reading this, but O to the M to the G. Not everyone will want to read this (that’s how I heard about it, actually, during a twitter discussion on censorship), but again this is a startlingly brave book. Are you sensing a theme here with UKYA?

Jessie Hearts NYC – Keris Stainton

I love New York so I want to draw hearts around this book, if you pardon the pun. It’s sweet and funny and I’m a bit in love with Finn. Of all the YA books I’ve read, he’s one of the few boys I still find myself thinking about. I can see him so clearly, standing on that curb with too much gel in his hair, trying to hail a cab with a bunch of peonies in his hand.

Just in Case – Meg Rosoff

I’m ashamed to admit that this is the only Meg Rosoff book I’ve read. I know. I know. But Just in Case is fantastic and, you won’t be surprised to hear, beautifully written. I’m also ashamed to admit that it took me far too long to make the Justin Case/Just in Case connection.

Noughts and Crosses – Malorie Blackman

Bow down. Even you. *points* Yes, you. Why aren’t you bowing? This book. THIS BOOK. Yes, it’s disturbing and painful and so loud it’s uncomfortable to read at times, but it’s also tender and beautiful and if even a handful of the people who read it think about what it’s trying to say, then that makes it a very important book.

Stolen – Lucy Christopher

I couldn’t wait to read this book. I’ve always been fascinated by Stockholm Syndrome so I devoured this in one sitting. I wanted Christopher to go there, I waited for her to go there, but she didn’t. Perhaps she was right not to, after all, I’ve read far too many YA books where unhealthy relationships are portrayed as romantic and yeah, no more of that, please. All of that aside, the writing is stunning. The descriptions of the Outback had me sweating at times.

The Knife of Never Letting Go – Patrick Ness

I was going to put A Monster Calls on this list because that made me cry so much the bloke sitting opposite me on the train asked me if I was okay. But then I remembered that I haven’t read the final book in this trilogy because I don’t want it to end, that’s how much I love this book. I really can’t say more than that.

Wasted – Nicola Morgan

The premise of this book is very clever: Jack makes decisions based on the flip of a coin. In the end, you’re presented with two outcomes that you have to choose between. As I said, very clever. I was rapt.


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Before I Die by Jenny Downham

Tessa has just months to live. Fighting back against hospital visits, endless tests, drugs with excruciating side-effects, Tessa compiles a list. It’s her To Do Before I Die list. And number one is Sex.

Released from the constraints of ‘normal’ life, Tessa tastes new experiences to make her feel alive while her failing body struggles to keep up. Tessa’s feelings, her relationships with her father and brother, her estranged mother, her best friend, and her new boyfriend, all are painfully crystallised in the precious weeks before Tessa’s time finally runs out.

Before I Die has been made into a film starring Dakota Fanning. It has a new title – Now Is Good – and will be released in the UK later this year.


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Laura of Sister Spooky: Book Fangirl’s Top 10 (and more) UKYA books

Laura of Sister Spooky: Book Fangirl‘s Top 10 UKYA picks. Plus a couple of extras she couldn’t resist (luckily for me). 

1. Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman: I adored this book for it’s ace storytelling as well as the way Malorie chooses to confront difficult issues like racism, social divides and terrorism.

2. His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman: A story full of magic and morals that is so cleverly woven together you can only read it in awe.

3. Adrian Mole, Aged 13 and 3/4 by Sue Townsend: one of the 1st YA I ever read as a teen and it made me feel happy that there were books with teens in and the embarrassing bits in too

4. Rockoholic by C.J.Skuse: I adore C.J.’s ability to make me completely connect with Jody and her love of music and the sadness in her life.

5. You Against Me by Jenny Downham: a heart wrenching book that leaves you numb

6. Witch Child by Celia Rees: wonderful storytelling and a fab take on historical fiction

7. Ash Mistry and the Savage Fortress by Sarwat Chadda: *bows at Sarwat* not only is this book full of humour and geekiness I adore but it has a kick ass hero that isn’t just you typical clean cut blond boy.

8. Torn by Cat Clarke: one of the few books I read that had me gripped and terrified.

9. My Swordhand Is Singing by Marcus Sedgwick: Haunting and scary. Like a classic Gothic novel for a YA audience that doesn’t dumb down because it’s YA.

10. Shadows on the Moon by Zoe Marriott: I cried; if you know me then you’d realise that makes this book GOLD!

I know this is a Top Ten list but I wanna give you two special mentions for books I would have put on my list but they’ve yet to be published.  I HIGHLY recommend you watch out for these two both out in June 2012

So

Emma Hearts LA by Keris Stainton: This is Keris’ next book and Keris (the super angel she is) let me get a sneaky peek at it. One of the first non-editor eyes to see it and I fell in love with the city, the characters, the romance and the sense of humour.  Sometimes you just need this kind of book in your life to give you a warm hug and a giggle. I’d flag this one up on your wish lists now because it was so wonderful!

and the second book

Geekhood by Andy Robb: Yes, I’ve been banging on about this one on my twitter since I read it but I just adored it. In my review I described it as ‘Adrian Mole for the Geek Generation’ and I mean every word. A fan-tabulous debut author who would be up on my Top 10 the second his book is published. His book and Andy himself are funny and honest. A read for boys and girls alike. Buy, buy buy.