UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


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Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge

710437Twelve-year-old Mosca Mye hasn’t got much. Her cruel uncle keeps her locked up in his mill, and her only friend is her pet goose, Saracen, who’ll bite anything that crosses his path. But she does have one small, rare thing: the ability to read. She doesn’t know it yet, but in a world where books are dangerous things, this gift will change her life.

Enter Eponymous Clent, a smooth-talking con man who seems to love words nearly as much as Mosca herself. Soon Mosca and Clent are living a life of deceit and danger — discovering secret societies, following shady characters onto floating coffeehouses, and entangling themselves with crazed dukes and double-crossing racketeers. It would be exactly the kind of tale Mosca has always longed to take part in, until she learns that her one true love — words — may be the death of her.


A Face Like Glass by Frances Hardinge

In Caverna, lies are an art — and everyone’s an artist . . .

In the underground city of Caverna the world’s most skilled craftsmen toil in the darkness to create delicacies beyond compare — wines that can remove memories, cheeses that can make you hallucinate and perfumes that convince you to trust the wearer, even as they slit your throat. The people of Caverna are more ordinary, but for one thing: their faces are as blank as untouched snow. Expressions must be learned, and only the famous Facesmiths can teach a person to show (or fake) joy, despair or fear — at a price.

Into this dark and distrustful world comes Neverfell, a little girl with no memory of her past and a face so terrifying to those around her that she must wear a mask at all times. For Neverfell’s emotions are as obvious on her face as those of the most skilled Facesmiths, though entirely genuine. And that makes her very dangerous indeed …

Visit Frances’s website

A Face Like Glass is on our UKYA Top 100 list.


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Jenna Burtenshaw’s Top 10 UKYA reads

Jenna Burtenshaw, author of Wintercraft, Blackwatch and Legacy (out 10 May), shares her Top 10 favourite UKYA reads.

1: Verdigris Deep by Frances Hardinge

A witch, a curse, and spooky goings-on.  Everything about this story is dark, creepy, and wonderful.

2: Floodland by Marcus Sedgwick

I love books set in desolate futures. Floodland is one of my favourites.

3: The Bartimaeus Series by Jonathan Stroud

Four books filled with magicians and djinn, magic and corruption.  If you like action and sarcastic comedy, this is a must read series.

4: Pastworld by Ian Beck

Victorian London meets futuristic London, and there’s a mysterious killer on the loose.  Smoggy and atmospheric.

5: The Hunting Ground by Cliff McNish

I read this book in one sitting.  It’s a lot darker than I expected. Tense, very creepy, and well worth a read.

6: The Vanishing Of Katharina Linden by Helen Grant

Set in Germany, this book recalls dramatic events in a young girl’s life (and starts with one character bursting into flames). Put on your detective hat and enjoy.

7: Skellig by David Almond

Who is the stranger living in the garage? A wonderful story about hope, family, and friendship.

8: The Septimus Heap Series by Angie Sage

A fantastic world of magic, dragons, and talking messenger rats. Great fun.

9: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness and Siobhan Dowd

I don’t often cry when reading books, but I needed tissues at the end of this one.

10: The Larklight Series by Philip Reeve

Steampunk swashbuckling set in space. I’ll say no more.