UKYA

Celebrating Young Adult fiction by UK authors


1 Comment

COMING SOON: House of Windows by Alexia Casale

alexia‘The body is a house of many windows: there we all sit, showing ourselves and crying on the passers-by to come and love us.’ Robert Louis Stevenson

Nick hates it when people call him a genius. Sure, he’s going to Cambridge University aged 15, but he says that’s just because he works hard. And, secretly, he only works hard to get some kind of attention from his workaholic father.

Not that his strategy is working.

When he arrives at Cambridge, he finds the work hard and socialising even harder. Until, that is, he starts to cox for the college rowing crew and all hell breaks loose…

Expected publication: July 2nd 2016 by Faber and Faber


Author Gary Meehan’s Top 10 UK YA Books

Gary_Meehan_520x520Gary Meehan is the author of True Fire. He’s chosen his Top 10 “in no particular order.”

The Bone Dragon by Alexia Casale

A girl recovers from post-traumatic stress disorder by retreating into a fantasy world. Or is it fantasy? Beautifully written and thought provoking.

images-4The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾ by Sue Townsend

I’ve grown up with Adrian these past — oh my god, thirty years (pause to contemplate mortality). The first remains a devastatingly funny read for anyone who’s ever worried about doing the right thing, the pretty girl in the class, and how long their thingy is.

Geek Girl by Holly Smale

A witty, charming tale of a bullied geeky girl who accidentally becomes a model. Plenty of heart and one of the most surprising meet-cute scenes you’re likely to read.

18482265Boys Don’t Knit by TS Easton

A spiritual successor to Adrian Mole, in that it’s a told as teenage boy’s diary. Very funny, but with a serious message. Many YA books encourage girls to do ‘boy’ things; this one lets boys know it’s okay to be ‘girly’. I still have no idea how knitting actually works though.

Heart-Shaped Bruise by Tanya Byrne

Proof you don’t need a likeable or even sympathetic heroine to make a story compelling. You know something bad’s gonna happen, but you can’t stop reading.

UnknownNowhere by Jon Robinson

Ah, some good old-fashioned sci-fi. An intriguing premise — why have all these kids been snatched and locked up — a fast-paced adventure, and hints of something manipulating the fundamental nature of the universe.

Trouble by Non Pratt

An honest story of teenage lust and its consequences, shot through with comic moments. Read it, kids, and let your next purchase be a jumbo pack of condoms.

Unknown-1Half Bad by Sally Green

A tale of brutality and paranoia, unbending bureaucracy and the nature of good and evil — a bit of light reading, then. Tense and thought-provoking.

Code Red Lipstick by Sarah Sky

A fun, lively adventure with a kick-ass, kick-head, kick-everything heroine. Not everything has to be dripping in angst, you know.

A Tale Etched in Blood and Hard Black Pencil by Christopher Brookmyre

My stretching-the-definition-of-YA entry. It’s a tale of bunch of kids growing up wrapped in a murder mystery set when the kids are adults, but it’s the acutely observed school scenes that stick in the mind. If it’s a measure of book you’re a little heartbroken to leave the characters behind, then this measures up.


3 Comments

The Bone Dragon by Alexia Casale

ca3ea47879017c8b7696f7e03fd87cfcEvie’s shattered ribs have been a secret for the last four years. Now she has found the strength to tell her adoptive parents, and the physical traces of her past are fixed – the only remaining signs a scar on her side and a fragment of bone taken home from the hospital, which her uncle Ben helps her to carve into a dragon as a sign of her strength.

Soon this ivory talisman begins to come to life at night, offering wisdom and encouragement in roaming dreams of smoke and moonlight that come to feel ever more real.

As Evie grows stronger there remains one problem her new parents can’t fix for her: a revenge that must be taken. And it seems that the Dragon is the one to take it.


UKYA Books of the Year 2013: Part 1

It’s that time of year again…we’re asking writers, bloggers and other bookish people to pick their UKYA books of the year.  Starting today with picks from awesome UKYA authors Lee Weatherly, Zoe Marriott, James Dawson and Rhian Ivory.  Feel free to add your picks of the year in the comments.

More tomorrow!

untitledGeek Girl by Holly Smale. Picked by Lee Weatherly, author of the Angel trilogy: ‘ I really loved it; thought it was SO funny.’  Good news for other Geek Girl fans –  and there are many-  Holly has been signed for three more Geek Girl books.

 

 

 

ShadowsShadows by Robin McKinley. Picked by Zoe Marriott, author of the Name of the Blade trilogy: ‘Shadows shows exactly why the author is a legend. Her magical world – almost but not quite like the real one – is so multi-textured and well-grounded that it was a surprise everytime I put it down and realised I didn’t live there myself. And anyone who has ever been oppressed by the supreme delight of McKinley’s animal characters will also find much to love in Shadows’.

 

 

 

tinderTinder by Sally Gardner. Picked by James Dawson, author of  Cruel Summer: ‘ A scary, evocative gothic fairytale.’

 

 

 

James also picked Dawn O’Porter’s Paper Aeroplanes: ‘A gritty but hilarious coming-of-age untitledfriendship story.

 

 

 

untitledThe Bone Dragon by Alexia Casale, picked by Rhian Ivory, author of The Bad Girls Club (as Rhian Tracey) : ‘Beautifully written, dealing with a very sensitive subject matter in an innovative and believable manner.’